A Mind Forever Voyaging
A Mind Forever Voyaging (cover) by Infocom
Published: 1985, Infocom
Author:
Steve Meretzky
Genre:
Adventure
Media:
Disk

Difficulty Level: Advanced

The story begins in the world of 2031, a world on the brink of chaos. The economy of the United States of America (USNA) has been stagnating for decades. Crackpot religions are springing up all over the place. Crime and urban decay are rampant. Schools have become violent, chaotic places ill-suited for educating children. Today's youth frequently use joybooths to "tune-out" the world, leading in the extreme case to joybooth suicide, where a psychological addict wastes away in his or her private nirvana.

A Mind Forever Voyaging was Infocom's 17th game. It was written by Steve Meretzky, author of Planetfall, Sorcerer, and co-author of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

After World War III plunged the world in chaos, the think tanks of the government designed a 10-year plan that would put the world back to the right track. However, before they implement the plan they want to test its effectiveness, and the means to test it is you! You are PRISM, a sentient computer who will enter in a simulation of the future as it is supposed to be when the plan is implemented. You are expected to verify if the plan will be successful or not...

A Mind Forever Voyaging
A Mind Forever Voyaging (game) by Infocom


For more information about the Infocom text adventure game A Mind Forever Voyaging, please view the Infocom category in the C64 games database or visit the external links to other Infocom related content at the end of this article.

References to Infocom on the internet may also be found under the software company Activision, which bought Infocom in 1986.

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The text excerpt in italics below the credit information is taken from the cover of the game and ©Copyright 1985 Infocom.


Thank you to the following websites, which were used for sourcing some images, that appear in this article:
The Infocom Gallery.